Apple iPhones in Uganda

Apple iPhones in Uganda
Apple iPhones in Uganda

According to the Times of Israel’s own reports, after the incident the Israelis reportedly sent out a statement that included a photo of the Israeli flag at the top of the flag and the words “I love you guys (the name for Israel).”

The Times claimed it was “completely baseless, but that he may have been talking about the Israeli flag during a diplomatic meeting.” The Times added that the Israeli Embassy wrote in a statement, “The Embassy and its citizens condemn those who attack peace in the region and in Uganda.”

The statement also stated, “We do not condone any incidents or acts,” and “All efforts should be made to ensure that all visitors understand our words and actions in Uganda.”

Kiev called the report “one step in addressing the concerns” voiced by the Ugandan people, and said Uganda should respond by sending a special envoy to provide “full attention” to the situation, and “if possible, to help in any manner in order to help alleviate the crisis in Uganda.”

The Israeli embassy did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Daily Beast.
Apple iPhones in Uganda

In the United States, according to the Center for American Progress Health Information Center’s latest Health Education Survey, an estimated 6 percent of U.S. adults aged 18 to 24 have health insurance or have enrolled in an insurance plan. In Uganda, the figure is 7 percent. Those living in rural areas receive only 20 percent of their costs.

The data, produced by the Center for American Progress, focuses on “the distribution of health insurance coverage among people living near the cities,” and provides a snapshot of the federal income rates for the population of these areas.

On average, a 1.7-percentage-point increase in rural income results in 25 people with health insurance on average, said The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Pennsylvania, who was not involved in the study. In comparison, a 4.1 percent increase in urban income results in 4,500 people with insurance from 2003 to 2011.

“This is a small fraction but in many cases may not be significant,” said Andrew Wilcox, senior vice president for research at the Center for American Progress Health Information Center. “So unless we look at how people get subsidies, it would appear to be one area where the data suggest we need to address that.”
Apple iPhones in Uganda